Quotes

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  • Statistics are like a bikini. What they present is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.  Aaron Levenstein

  • We the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.  Abraham Lincoln

  • Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable - a most sacred right - a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.  Abraham Lincoln

  • It is the highest impertinence and presumption, therefore, in kings and ministers to pretend to watch over the economy of private people, and to restrain their expense.... They are themselves always, and without any exception, the greatest spendthrifts in society. Let them look well after their own expense, and they may safely trust private people with theirs.  Adam Smith

  • When an American says that he loves his country, he means not only that he loves the New England hills, the prairies glistening in the sun, the wide and rising plains, the great mountains, and the sea. He means that he loves an inner air, an inner light in which freedom lives and in which a man can draw the breath of self-respect.  Adlai Stevenson

  • This year will go down in history. For the first time, a civilized nation has full gun registration. Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient, and the world will follow our lead into the future!  Adolph Hitler [1935] The Weapons Act of Nazi Germany.

  • Tariffs, quotas and other import restrictions protect the business of the rich at the expense of high cost of living for the poor. Their intent is to deprive you of the right to choose, and to force you to buy the high-priced inferior products of politically favored companies.  Alan Burris

  • Deficit spending is simply a scheme for the confiscation of wealth  Alan Greenspan

  • In the absence of the gold standard, there is no way to protect savings from confiscation through inflation. ... This is the shabby secret of the welfare statists' tirades against gold. Deficit spending is simply a scheme for the confiscation of wealth. Gold stands in the way of this insidious process. It stands as a protector of property rights. If one grasps this, one has no difficulty in understanding the statists' antagonism toward the gold standard.  Alan Greenspan

  • Gold still represents the ultimate form of payment in the world.  Alan Greenspan

  • An almost hysterical antagonism towards the gold standard is one issue which unites statists of all persuasions. They seem to sense -- perhaps more clearly and subtly than many consistent defenders of laissez-faire -- that gold and economic freedom are inseparable, that the gold standard is an instrument of laissez-faire and that each implies and requires the other.  Alan Greenspan

  • Regulators talk a lot about systemic risk. They do not—and probably cannot—give a tight operational definition of what this means. So setting up an agency to prevent systemic risk, as Mr. Dodd has just proposed, is just another way to pick the public's purse. Systemic risk will forever remain in the eye of the beholder. Instead of shifting losses onto those that caused them, systemic risk regulation will continue to transfer cost to the taxpayers. The regulators protect the bankers. They continue to lose sight of their responsibility to protect the public.  Alan Meltzer

  • Freedom is nothing but a chance to be better.  Albert Camus

  • Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.  Albert Einstein

  • Force always attracts men of low morality.  Albert Einstein

  • It’s no accident that capitalism has brought with it progress, not merely in production but also in knowledge. Egoism and competition are, alas, stronger forces than public spirit and sense of duty.  Albert Einstein

  • Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.  Albert Einstein (attribute)

  • It is unfortunately none too well understood that, just as the State has no money of its own, so it has no power of its own.  Albert J. Nock

  • The mind is like the stomach. It is not how much you put into it that counts, but how much it digests.  Albert J. Nock

  • It is an economic axiom as old as the hills that goods and services can be paid for only with goods and services.  Albert J. Nock

  • Taking the State wherever found, striking into its history at any point, one sees no way to differentiate the activities of its founders, administrators and beneficiaries from those of a professional-criminal class  Albert J. Nock

  • As I understand the term, it is the very essence of democracy that the individual citizen shall be invested with the inalienable and sovereign right to make an ass of himself; and furthermore, that he shall be invested with a sovereign right of publicity to tell all the world that he is doing so.  Albert J. Nock

  • Man tends always to satisfy his needs and desires with the least possible exertion.  Albert J. Nock

  • Considering mankind's indifference to freedom, their easy gullibility and their facile response to conditioning, one might very plausibly argue that collectivism is the political mode best suited to their disposition and their capacities. Under its regime the citizen, like the soldier, is relieved of the burden of initiative and is divested of all responsibility, save for doing as he is told.  Albert J. Nock

  • It would seem that in Paine's view the code of government should be that of the legendary king Pausole, who prescribed but two laws for his subjects, the first being, Hurt no man, and the second, Then do as you please; and that the whole business of government should be the purely negative one of seeing that this code is carried out.  Albert J. Nock

  • ... the State has ever shown any disposition to suppress crime, but only to safeguard its own monopoly of crime.  Albert J. Nock

  • Lincoln's phrase, "of the people, by the people, for the people" was probably the most effective single stroke of propaganda ever made in behalf of republican State prestige.  Albert J. Nock

  • Freedom is therefore a great good, tolerance a great virtue and regimentation a great misfortune. Meanwhile there is still some freedom left in the world. Many young people, it is true, do not seem to value freedom. But some of us still believe that, with­out freedom, human beings cannot become fully hu­man and that freedom is therefore supremely valuable. Perhaps the forces that now menace freedom are too strong to be resisted for very long. It is still our duty to do whatever we can to resist them.  Aldous Huxley

  • Most ignorance is vincible ignorance. We don’t know because we don’t want to know.  Aldous Huxley

  • In the general course of human nature, A power over a man's subsistence amounts to a power over his will.  Alexander Hamilton

  • The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.  Alexander Hamilton

  • A long war almost always places nations in this sad alternative: that their defeat delivers them to destruction and their triumph to despotism  Alexis de Tocqueville

  • It is not an endlessly expanding list of rights ???the “right” to an education; the “right” to health care; the “right” to food and housing. That is not freedom. That is dependency. Those are not rights. Those are the rations of slavery – hay and a barn for human cattle.  Alexis de Tocqueville

  • ... the attributes of the federal government were carefully defined [in the Constitution], and all that was not included among them was declared to remain to the governments of the individual states. Thus the government of the states remained the rule, and that of the federal government the exception.  Alexis de Tocqueville

  • Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word, equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude.  Alexis de Tocqueville

  • Crime does not pay ... as well as politics.  Alfred E. Newman

  • The art of progress is to preserve order amid change, and to preserve change amid order.  Alfred North Whitehead

  • Alliance - in international politics, the union of two thieves who have their hands so deeply inserted in each other's pockets that they cannot separately plunder a third.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Anoint, v.: To grease a king or other great functionary already sufficiently slippery.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Bigot: One who is obstinately and zealously attached to an opinion that you do not entertain.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Compromise, n. Such an adjustment of conflicting interests as gives each adversary the satisfaction of thinking he has got what he ought not to have, and is deprived of nothing except what was justly his due.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Conservative, n: A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from the Liberal who wishes to replace them with others.  Ambrose Bierce

  • In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Liberty: One of Imagination's most precious possessions.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Revolution, n. In politics, an abrupt change in the form of misgovernment.  Ambrose Bierce

  • To apologize is to lay the foundation for a future offense.  Ambrose Bierce

  • We know what happens to people who stay in the middle of the road. They get run over.  Ambrose Bierce

  • Politics: The conduct of public affairs for private advantage.  Ambrose Bierce

  • the poet, the artist or the musician is almost invariably an audible socialist [because] he is not a thinker but a feeler. ... some of these ‘intellectuals’ . . . might better be called emotionals  Ambrose Bierce

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