Reading

This list is under construction. Check back periodically to see additions.

This list is from Gary Gibson. To see his introduction to this list go here or here.

1.    Economics in One Lesson by Henry Hazlitt – Probably the very first book everyone with any interest in economic thought should read. Hazlitt challenges the reader to think beyond the immediate benefits of any economic policy.

2.    The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek – This is Hayek’s masterwork, a passionate warning about the dangers of state control of production.

3.    The Vision of Ayn Rand: The Basic Principles of Objectivism by Nathaniel Branden – Collection of lectures by Nathaniel Branden providing a detailed exposition of Ayn Rand’s philosophy.

4.     The Law by Frederic Bastiat – The 1850 classic about government intervention in the economy causing the subversion of life and liberty.

5.    End the Fed by Ron Paul – Congressman Ron Paul’s explanation of the unconstitutionality and danger of the Federal Reserve.

6.    Capitalism and Freedom: Fortieth Anniversary Edition by Milton Friedman – an explanation of why competitive capitalism is the necessary framework for economic and political freedom.

7.    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand – The towering work of fiction that has changed so many lives. With her narrative and dialogue Ayn Rand makes the unassailable case for capitalism and liberty.

8.    The Market for Liberty by Morris and Linda Tannehill – This underappreciated classic persuasively argues for a stateless world where private enterprise provides everything better than government ever could.

9.    The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible by Ken Schooland – A very accessible allegorical tale of all the ills of government intervention.

10.     Applied Economics: Thinking Beyond Stage One by Thomas Sowell – Sowell goes beyond the first stage of a wide range of policies and examines their disastrous effects further down the line. From socialized health care schemes to rent control to government backed mortgages.

Read more: Top Libertarian and Austrian Economic Books http://dailyreckoning.com/top-libertarian-and-austrian-economic-books/#ixzz1Isx9imQr

Greg Ransom provides the following list of books on intellectuals, academics and socialists:

Robert Murphy on The Chicago School of Economics vs. The Austrian School